Author Topic: Basic role-playing system models?  (Read 12638 times)

Krice

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Basic role-playing system models?
« on: April 21, 2015, 12:19:05 PM »
We have some RL libraries, but why don't we have a RPG system which is simple, open source (or rather free from license restrictions) and easy to extend with new stuff? For me the RPG system is really the big problem in roguelike (and role-playing game) development. Do we even have anything like that in tabletop form?

mushroom patch

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2015, 03:37:10 PM »
. . .

I strongly suspect this is going to be an exercise in "no true Scotsman," but why does the d20 system not satisfy your requirements? As for one actually implemented as software, can't say I've ever looked and preliminary searches didn't show anything obvious. I'd still be surprised if nothing exists at all.

Krice

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2015, 08:06:18 PM »
why does the d20 system not satisfy your requirements?

It sucks.

AgingMinotaur

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2015, 09:10:42 PM »
I haven't really been deep into tabletop RPG-ing for about 20 years, but I'd also believe that's the place to look for a good, explicitly open-source system. I think designing and implementing a generic/basic rule system isn't so hard, though, unless you're going down the simulationist road or doing something quite special (in which case you need to roll your own, anyway). Squirm was loosely based on White Wolf's Ars Magica and World of Darkness series, rolling for successes against a set difficulty. The system I'm using for LoSt is a bit more abstract, and not quite ironed out yet, but loosely based on the roll of a six-sided die.

When I was playing RPGs with my friends back in the days, the rules were never that important, because what mattered was coming together to tell a fun/good story. A tactical RL should probably have a system that's more tailored for the specific needs of that RL, though, lest it feel hopelessly "next-gen" (let's face it, next-gen RLs are just sooo 90-ies).

As always,
Minotauros
This matir, as laborintus, Dedalus hous, hath many halkes and hurnes ... wyndynges and wrynkelynges.

Krice

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2015, 06:52:27 AM »
I think designing and implementing a generic/basic rule system isn't so hard

I think it is. That's why we don't see those often, people rather copy existing systems. At least it feels like trying to design your own RPG system is such a big task. And I'm actually looking for something which may not even exist which is a system without experience levels (or experience). I guess you can create some kind of system quite easily, but balancing it is the difficult part.

Rickton

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2015, 02:58:21 PM »
Here's a (probably non-exhaustive) list of "open source" tabletop RPGs. Some are games, some are just systems. Whether or not you'll like them is a different story, but they do exist.
Creator of the 7DRL Possession: Escape from the Nether Regions
And its sequel, simply titled Possession

Zireael

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2015, 07:24:09 AM »
. . .

I strongly suspect this is going to be an exercise in "no true Scotsman," but why does the d20 system not satisfy your requirements? As for one actually implemented as software, can't say I've ever looked and preliminary searches didn't show anything obvious. I'd still be surprised if nothing exists at all.

I'll add that the d20 can be tweaked to your heart's content, there is even NO rule saying you need to use d20 in d20, you could use 3d6 or d% or whatever instead :D

Aukustus

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2015, 08:28:18 AM »
d20 is somewhat interesting because I think there was a part in the license that prevents using it in a interactive stuff like video games

Krice

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2015, 08:32:00 AM »
Some are games, some are just systems. Whether or not you'll like them is a different story, but they do exist.

I've been of course trying to find something useful, but most RPG systems are a lot like D&D.

Krice

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2015, 08:37:29 AM »
d20 is somewhat interesting because I think there was a part in the license that prevents using it in a interactive stuff like video games

Really? I thought the System Reference Document part is open game license, but some special item and monster names are not, because they are part of some specific game.

I starts to look again like I have to create everything myself, because the system I want doesn't exist. What a surprise.

Aukustus

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2015, 09:42:16 AM »
d20 is somewhat interesting because I think there was a part in the license that prevents using it in a interactive stuff like video games

Really? I thought the System Reference Document part is open game license, but some special item and monster names are not, because they are part of some specific game.

I starts to look again like I have to create everything myself, because the system I want doesn't exist. What a surprise.

"Q: Does the definition of an "Interactive Game" preclude me from creating an online RPG, MUD, MUSH, MOO, etc.?

A: Yes. Please do not contact us requesting exceptions be made for your game or to inquire about getting a license to make a game. Wizards has an exclusive licensee for all electronic games based on our products and cannot enter into games licenses with any additional parties."

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=d20/srdfaq/20040123b

Zireael

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2015, 11:54:19 AM »
I can list at least 3 d20 MUD/MUSH games, the rules for one are FR-flavored, one runs on Pathfinder-flavored rules and one is Star Wars flavored.

Obviously, none use the project identity or otherwise trademarked stuff. And there is a lot of homebrew content and variant rules involved.

Add to this list Angband, Incursion, your own Temple of Torment...

Aukustus

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2015, 11:58:07 AM »
I can list at least 3 d20 MUD/MUSH games, the rules for one are FR-flavored, one runs on Pathfinder-flavored rules and one is Star Wars flavored.

Obviously, none use the project identity or otherwise trademarked stuff. And there is a lot of homebrew content and variant rules involved.

Add to this list Angband, Incursion, your own Temple of Torment...

But mine just uses simulated d20 for calculating my own rules. Only thing that looks like srd thing is the melee hitting that is d20 + To Hit Bonus (basically BAB in D&D stuff) against target AC. And AC and To Hit Bonus are on 0-100 scale that is divided by 5 to make it usable with d20 die.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2015, 12:00:55 PM by Aukustus »

Omnivore

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2015, 01:56:35 PM »
d20 is somewhat interesting because I think there was a part in the license that prevents using it in a interactive stuff like video games

Really? I thought the System Reference Document part is open game license, but some special item and monster names are not, because they are part of some specific game.

I starts to look again like I have to create everything myself, because the system I want doesn't exist. What a surprise.

"Q: Does the definition of an "Interactive Game" preclude me from creating an online RPG, MUD, MUSH, MOO, etc.?

A: Yes. Please do not contact us requesting exceptions be made for your game or to inquire about getting a license to make a game. Wizards has an exclusive licensee for all electronic games based on our products and cannot enter into games licenses with any additional parties."

http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=d20/srdfaq/20040123b

Completely unenforceable hogwash.  Another example that people can and will put anything into a license document.

mushroom patch

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Re: Basic role-playing system models?
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2015, 02:57:47 PM »
I can list at least 3 d20 MUD/MUSH games, the rules for one are FR-flavored, one runs on Pathfinder-flavored rules and one is Star Wars flavored.

Obviously, none use the project identity or otherwise trademarked stuff. And there is a lot of homebrew content and variant rules involved.

Add to this list Angband, Incursion, your own Temple of Torment...

Angband is not d20. What are you talking about?