Author Topic: Games without monotony  (Read 15976 times)

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Re: Games without monotony
« Reply #30 on: August 20, 2013, 02:02:20 AM »
Skyrim's combat system is far from being brilliant but I think is does the job fairly well. A shallow combat system would be the one  implemented in Morrowind (your all-time-favorite), along with its utterly unbalanced game play. Nothing wrong about having Morrowind as all-time-favorite, I just think it sounds contradictory having such unbalanced game considered your all-time-favorite when Skyrim has so many things improved upon it. You did say that Daggerfall, Morrowind, and Oblivion were the most unbalanced games ever made.

Yes, I did say that.  Because it's true - Morrowind is extremely unbalanced and its combat is bad.  I can say things like that and still like Morrowind because I can look at it objectively and understand that for all of its virtues, Morrowind is an imperfect work.

Morrowind has one of the top 5 settings in any game ever made.  It's possibly the best treasure hunting game in the world.  Its item and leveling systems allow for a huge number of wildly different characters.  Those are some of the reasons why I like Morrowind, and in those regards, it is far superior to its successors.

I'm totally willing to have this discussion, but only if you'll engage in it on a higher level than "Skyrim doesn't have faults because it sold a lot and I like it."

Endorya

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Re: Games without monotony
« Reply #31 on: August 20, 2013, 06:36:05 AM »
Well, my only presumption here is "TES4: Skyrim has major flaws", as I've not played it or learned enough about it to tell otherwise. I'm not saying anything about anyone's acknowledgement of the flaws. One can enjoy a game despite noticing its flaws (like I do in the case of, say, Mass Effect 3 or Dragon Age 2) or being unaware of its flaws or even refusing to acknowledge its obvious flaws because they like its good features so much (though I don't recommend the last approach). It's my analysis of Elder Scrolls' popularity: their good features are so great that they eclipse the major flaws, making TES very successful. However, I'm pretty sure that they wouldn't stand up to a rigorous game design examination from any angle, including the designer's intent (which I imagine wasn't actually "so, in Oblivion, when you level up, everything gets stronger by a bigger margin then you get! Let's teach those players that levelling up is bad play!").
Well, thanks for clearing it out then. I totally agree with your sayings in this post.
"You are never alone. Death is always near watching you."

Endorya

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Re: Games without monotony
« Reply #32 on: August 20, 2013, 06:51:28 AM »
Yes, I did say that.  Because it's true - Morrowind is extremely unbalanced and its combat is bad.  I can say things like that and still like Morrowind because I can look at it objectively and understand that for all of its virtues, Morrowind is an imperfect work.
Then you must understand why people love Skyrim. There is no point having the: "Skyrim has bad mechanics and it is totally unbalanced as an argument" when you recognize that even such games can be so enjoyable. You just "confessed" that someone can enjoy an unbalanced game with crappy combat mechanics, then I really don't understand why can't you acknowledge the fact that Skyrim is a potentially good. All you keep doing is denying all the good things I say about it, even implying that its popularity doesn't add nothing to its value.

Why is this so hard for you to accept it? As I said in my early posts, Skyrim is about exploring and it does that pretty well, hence its success, despising if you personally like (or not) the way its exploration mechanics play.

I'm totally willing to have this discussion, but only if you'll engage in it on a higher level than "Skyrim doesn't have faults because it sold a lot and I like it."
Please, don't distort my point of view or my sayings. I simply said that a game that sells so well can't be that flawed as you seemed to imply. Go and re-read my previous posts. I never said at any time that Skyrim is perfect nor I would ever attempt to imply that Skyrim is awesome just because I like it. I do believe that if many persons like a game then there is a chance it is a good game by offering way more positive than negative experiences.

If we are going to have this discuss I need you to stay coherent throughout the whole part of it. Coherency is the key to maintain a viable discussion.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2013, 01:06:42 PM by Endorya »
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Re: Games without monotony
« Reply #33 on: August 20, 2013, 12:47:36 PM »
I will explain the rest in PMs, and I apologize to everyone for not doing so earlier.