Author Topic: Viability of Python  (Read 15310 times)

yam655

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Re: Viability of Python
« Reply #15 on: September 14, 2012, 12:42:03 AM »
I wouldn't worry about installers and creating executables at this point. It pays to keep them in mind for the distant future, but that's probably something you would want to tackle after getting something together.

I agree completely. First get something working.

The folks who have issues with running something for a "different" version of Python? Those are the people that benefit from having easy installers. It is a subset of users that is important to get, considering the size of the Roguelike userbase.

When the extensions are readily available for a platform the py2exe/py2app solutions are simple and straight-forward. It's a distraction until things are working -- but if you're familiar with the process it's much faster to spin it up for a new project.

If you're familiar with the process and you've done it for a simple test using the extensions you plan to use beforehand, it is totally doable to have nightly builds for each platform for a 7DRL project. (Especially if you ignore the installers and just ship as ZIP files.)

If it is doable for a 7DRL (seven day Roguelike challenge) it is something you should seriously consider when your project hits the beta stage and you want real players to test it out.

Cheers,
Steven Black

Pueo

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Re: Viability of Python
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2012, 11:16:57 PM »
Thanks for all the replies, guys (and possibly gals :)).  I guess for now I'll work on Python, and if I start getting troubles with iOS, I'll just learn Objective C (which should be easy with my newfound Python knowledge) :P

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e11

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Re: Viability of Python
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2012, 09:44:40 AM »
i'm a novice programmer too who wants to write a simple roguelike, i learn two languages - c and python (well, a bit of javascript too, but it doesn't matter, for roguelikes it looks like a worse version of python with a browser instead of an interpreter) and i decided that python will be harder to write something for me as for an almost complete novice. yes, harder, i preferred to have arrays of structures, functions and sprintf instead handy classes, methods and python's amazing string support for two reasons:

with c i don't need any additional libs at all, even ncurses, i can have color and arrow input with basic c libs. it saved me a lot of time, i already have a working very basic game - draft of level generator (random placement of walls, random monsters, traps), basic ai (chasing, rounding obstacles), combat, moving&fighting hero, basic hud, even some drafts of item implementation (inventory, dropping, looting), while if i had chosen python i would probably have spent most of time trying to understand how to use some lib to have almost the same output (i don't want to use graphic anyway)

easy executables and portability, i can use the same code for windows (compiled with cygwin) and linux, while i don't even figured yet how to make exe from a python script